When the Fed Chair Talks, People Listen

When the Fed Chair Talks, People Listen

The financial markets are on edge this year each time Fed Chair Jerome Powell takes the podium following a Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting.

The chart below shows that the Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index has gained or lost an average of 1.9% following the first six two-day FOMC meetings in 2022. And after the most recent November 2nd meeting, stocks see-sawed throughout the session but eventually ended the day sharply lower after hearing from the Fed Chair.

Initially, investors cheered when the official FOMC statement suggested that the Fed would consider all data before adjusting rates again. But Powell crushed the enthusiasm in his post-meeting press conference, saying the current inflation data did not support any change in the Fed’s position.

In many ways, Powell’s tough talk is understandable. Throughout 2021, he told investors that inflation was “transitory” and the FOMC made no change to monetary policy. But in 2022, inflation has been stubbornly high, and it’s the Fed’s job to maintain price stability. So, in some ways, Powell wants to restore the Fed’s credibility.

As you may have heard me say, “Don’t worry about the horse; just load the wagon.” Now is a time to stay focused on “your wagon,” and we’ll keep an eye on the “horses” at the FOMC.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2022 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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Ahead of the Midterms 2022

Ahead of the Midterms 2022

The midterm elections are underway. In many states, ballots have been delivered and, in several cases, already returned by Americans exercising one of the most sacred of their Constitutional rights.

Election Day is always the Tuesday following the first Monday in November. So, if you haven’t voted yet, you must cast your ballot today.

The results of elections almost always influence the economy, whether that be an immediate reaction from Wall Street or a long-term reaction due to policy changes. Midterm elections, in particular, can shake things up.

It’s too early to tell what major or minor changes might be coming, but some change is inevitable.

Such changes are among the many factors we consider when building your portfolio. The U.S. has major elections every two years, and it’s best to be prepared for some market volatility as the election results come in.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2022 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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Best Vacations: By Car, By Ship, By Foot, Once in a Lifetime

Best Vacations: By Car, By Ship, By Foot, Once in a Lifetime

“Travel is the only thing you buy that makes you richer.”¹ – Unknown

If travel for you is less about escaping life and more about living it, then consider these vacation ideas:

By Car

East Coast of Australia: There may be no better way to experience this amazing continent than by driving along its east coast, stretching from Melbourne in the south to Cairns to the north. This 2,500-mile drive carries you through rainforests, cities, mountains, and the outback, with the blue waters of the Pacific as a constant companion. Be sure to carve out time for the Great Barrier Reef, snorkeling, kayaking, and hiking along the way.

By Ship

Northwest Passage: For hundreds of years explorers tried, and failed, to find the fabled Northwest Passage. Travelers can now discover what eluded so many brave adventurers. Begin your journey in Greenland, sail past its fjords, and you’re on your way. As you penetrate deep into the Arctic, you’ll scrape against icebergs and marvel at the harshness and sublime beauty at the top of the world. But, it’s not just ice. See the remains of explorations that came before you and the polar bears that call this home.

By Foot

Camino de Santiago, Spain: Sometimes adventure is a journey to discover ourselves. This medieval pilgrimage through France, Spain, and Portugal to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in northwest Spain can take you weeks or months. Travelers can recover from a day’s walk at one of some 300 refugios that offer food, drink, and a clean place to sleep. It’s a mystical experience that gives you time to reflect on life, learn about yourself, and connect with kindred spirits.

Once in a Lifetime

Botswana, Africa: One of the most sparsely populated nations on earth, Botswana is dominated by the Kalahari Desert and the Okavango Delta, the world’s largest inland delta and now a UNESCO World Heritage site. The Okavango is the ideal spot to safari as its waters attract a richness of wildlife that is unmatched on the continent. The country’s focus on minimizing human impact means that your African experience will be both primal and transcendent.

1 TravelGoalGetter.com, 2017

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2022 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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Warren Buffett on Contrarian Investing

Warren Buffett on Contrarian Investing

You may have heard the phrase “contrarian investing,” but did you know that one of the most reliable contrary indicators is individual investors?

Retail investors often do the wrong thing at the wrong time. But this year, they have been mostly correct in their bearish view. In the chart below, you can see that for most of 2022, individuals have had little confidence in the stock market.

Warren Buffett has one of Wall Street’s most famous quotes about contrarian investing. He suggested investors “be fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful.” So is it time to be greedy, or is it best to remain fearful?

When we created your portfolio strategy, we anticipated there would be periods of market volatility. With your investing dollars, we’re not looking to time the market based on sentiment. Instead, we want to help you pursue your goals based on your time horizon and risk tolerance.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2022 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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New Retirement Contribution Limits for 2023

New Retirement Contribution Limits for 2023

The Internal Revenue Service has released new limits for the coming year. After months of high inflation and financial uncertainty, some of these cost-of-living-based adjustments have reached near-record levels.

Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs)
IRA contribution limits are up $500 in 2023 to $6,500. Catch-up contributions for those over age 50 remain at $1,000, bringing the total limit to $7,500.

Roth IRAs
The income phase-out range for Roth IRA contributions increases to $138,000-$153,000 for single filers and heads of household, a $9,000 increase. For married couples filing jointly, phase-out will be $218,000 to $228,000, a $14,000 increase. Married individuals filing separately see their phase-out range remain at $0-10,000.

Workplace Retirement Accounts
Those with 401(k), 403(b), 457 plans, and similar accounts will see a $2,000 increase for 2023, the limit rising to $22,500. Those aged 50 and older will now have the ability to contribute an extra $7,500, bringing their total limit to $30,000.

SIMPLE Accounts
A $1,500 increase in limits for 2023 gives individuals contributing to this incentive match plan a $15,500 stop light.

Other Changes
In addition to changes in contributions limits, the IRS also announced several other changes for 2023, including an increase to the annual exclusion for gifts to $17,000 per person and an increase to the estate tax exclusion threshold.

Keep in mind that we provide updates for informational purposes only, so consult with your tax professional before making any changes in anticipation of the new 2023 levels. You can also contact our offices, and we can provide you with information about the pending changes.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2022 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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Do Your Kids Know The Value of a Silver Spoon?

Do Your Kids Know The Value of a Silver Spoon?

You taught them how to read and how to ride a bike, but have you taught your children how to manage money?

One study households with student loan debt showed that the average amount owed was $47,671.1 And more than 20% of recipients with outstanding loans will either default or be delinquent in repaying those loans.2

For current college kids, it may be too late to avoid learning about debt the hard way. But if you still have children at home, save them (and yourself) some heartache by teaching them the basics of smart money management.

Have the conversation. Many everyday transactions can lead to discussions about money. At the grocery store, talk with your kids about comparing prices and staying within a budget. At the bank, teach them that the automated teller machine doesn’t just give you money for the asking. Show your kids a credit card statement to help them understand how “swiping the card” actually takes money out of your pocket.

Let them live it. An allowance program, where payments are tied to chores or household responsibilities, can help teach children the relationship between work and money. Your program might even include incentives or bonuses for exceptional work. Aside from allowances, you could create a budget for clothing or other items you provide. Let your kids decide how and when to spend the allotted money. This may help them learn to balance their wants and needs at a young age, when the stakes are not too high.

Teach kids about saving, investing, and even retirement planning. To encourage teenagers to save, you might offer a match program, say 25 cents for every dollar they put in a savings account. Once they have saved $1,000, consider helping them open a custodial investment account, then teach them how to research performance and ratings online. You might even think about opening an individual retirement account (IRA). Some parents offer to fund an IRA for their children as long as their children are earning a paycheck.3

As you teach your children about money, don’t get discouraged if they don’t take your advice. Mistakes made at this stage in life can leave a lasting impression. Also, resist the temptation to bail them out. We all learn better when we reap the natural consequences of our actions. Your children probably won’t be stellar money managers at first, but what they learn now could pay them back later in life – when it really matters.

1. NerdWallet, 2019
2. U.S. Department of Education, 2019
3. Contributions to a Traditional IRA may be fully or partially deductible, depending on your individual circumstance. Distributions from traditional IRA and most other employer-sponsored retirement plans are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken before age 59½, may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty. Generally, once you reach age 70½, you must begin taking required minimum distributions.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2022 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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How the Fed Has Navigated World Events

How the Fed Has Navigated World Events

I’ve always been a little cautious when people say, “it’s different this time.” But the table below suggests the Fed is approaching 2022’s inflation differently than other financial events in recent history.

There’s no doubt that the Fed is managing through a difficult time, and tightening appears to be the appropriate response. Fed Chair Powell knows that few financial events can be as devastating as high inflation over time – especially for those living on a fixed income.

I remain optimistic that the Fed has a strategy to tame inflation. In the meantime, if you have questions, please let me know. I’m always happy to hear from you.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2022 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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How You Can Purchase I Bonds Direct from the Treasury

How You Can Purchase I Bonds Direct from the Treasury

With inflation hovering near 40-year highs, some investors are looking for investments that keep pace with rising prices. For many, a Series I Savings Bond is just the ticket. I Bonds give investors a rate of return plus inflation protection and are backed by the U.S. government.

It’s been big business. The Treasury sold more than $27 billion of I Bonds since last year. That’s more than a 70-fold increase from 2020, when inflation hovered in the 1 percent range.1

Purchasing I Bonds through Treasurydirect.gov is simple. In fact, the site was recently redesigned, making now an excellent time to give it a look.2

Here’s how to get started.

1. Gather your info. Make sure you have the following close at hand: your taxpayer identification number, current address, checking or savings account information, and email address.

2. Go to Treasurydirect.gov’s account creation page. Navigate to the bottom of the page and select “Apply Now” on the left. This will begin your account creation journey. Next, you will choose between an Individual or Entity account. Select the Individual account type (the default option) and click “Submit.”

3. Enter your info. Using the information gathered in step 1, fill in the fields requested and check the box at the bottom to certify your Taxpayer Identification Number. Click “Submit.

4. Select a personalized image. Take some time here to select an image and caption you will remember. Think of this as a visual password for your account. Click “Submit.”

5. Secure your account. Select your password and security questions on this screen. Make sure the answers to your security questions are impossible to guess but easy to remember. Click “Submit” to move to the final step.

6. Check your email. Finally, look for your TreasuryDirect account number in your email. You’ll need this to log into your account later.3

You can begin purchasing I Bonds now that you’ve created your account. Here are a few things to keep in mind. I Bonds earn interest for 30 years unless you cash them in. You can do this after a year has passed from the time of purchase, but you’ll lose the previous three months of interest. However, if you let them mature for five years or more, there is no penalty.

The maximum amount you can invest is $10,000 per person per year. A married couple can buy up to $20,000. Parents can create custodial accounts for children and then make a purchase. A person can invest up to $15,000 if they elect to get tax refunds in I Bonds.4

Questions about I Bonds or anything else financial? Feel free to reach out anytime.

1. USInflationCalculator.com, 2022
2. BLS.gov, 2022
3. This is a hypothetical example used for illustrative purposes only. It is not representative of any specific investment or combination of investments. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2022 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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Inflation & Your Money

Inflation & Your Money

“If the current annual inflation rate is 8.2 percent, why do my bills seem like they’re 10 percent higher than last year?”1

Many of us ask ourselves that question, and it illustrates the importance of understanding how inflation is reported and how it can affect investments.

What Is Inflation?

Inflation is defined as an upward movement in the average level of prices. Each month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases a report called the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to track these fluctuations. It was developed from detailed expenditure information provided by families and individuals on purchases made in the following categories: food and beverages, housing, apparel, transportation, medical care, recreation, education and communication, and other groups and services.2

How Applicable Is the CPI?

While it’s the commonly used indicator of inflation, the CPI has come under scrutiny. For example, the CPI rose 7.9 percent for the 12-months ending in February 2022. However, a closer look at the report shows movement in prices on a more detailed level. Energy prices, for example, rose 25.6 percent during those 12 months.1

Are Investments Affected by Inflation?

They sure are. As inflation rises and falls, three notable effects are observed.

First, inflation reduces the real rate of return on investments. So, if an investment earned 6 percent for a 12-month period and inflation averaged 1.5 percent over that time, the investment’s real rate of return would have been 4.5 percent. If taxes are considered, the real rate of return may be reduced even further.3

Second, inflation puts purchasing power at risk. When prices rise, a fixed amount of money has the power to purchase fewer and fewer goods.

Third, inflation can influence the actions of the Federal Reserve. If the Fed wants to control inflation, it has various methods for reducing the amount of money in circulation. Hypothetically, a smaller supply of money would lead to less spending, which may lead to lower prices and lower inflation.

Empower Yourself with a Trusted Professional

When inflation is low, it’s easy to overlook how rising prices are affecting a household budget. On the other hand, when inflation is high, it may be tempting to make more sweeping changes in response to increasing prices. The best approach may be to reach out to your financial professional to help you develop a sound investment strategy that takes both possible scenarios into account

1. USInflationCalculator.com, 2022
2. BLS.gov, 2022
3. This is a hypothetical example used for illustrative purposes only. It is not representative of any specific investment or combination of investments. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2022 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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Understanding Marginal Income Tax Brackets

Understanding Marginal Income Tax Brackets

By any measure, the tax code is huge. It is over 2,000 pages long, and even longer with footnotes.1 And almost weekly, the Internal Revenue Service publishes a 20- to 50-page bulletin about various aspects of the tax code.2 Fortunately, it’s not necessary to wade through these massive libraries to get a basic understanding of how income taxes work. Knowing a few key concepts may provide a solid foundation. One of the key concepts is marginal income tax brackets. Taxpayers pay the tax rate in a given bracket only for that portion of their overall income that falls within that bracket’s range.

Tax Works

Seeing how marginal income tax brackets work is helpful because it shows the progressive nature of income taxes. It also helps you visualize how your total tax rate can be calculated. But remember, this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. Please consult a tax professional for specific information regarding your individual situation.

How Federal Income Tax Brackets Work

Say a married couple, filing jointly for the 2022 tax year, had a taxable income of $200,000. Each dollar over $178,150 – or $21,850 – would fall into the 24% federal income tax bracket. However, the couple’s total federal tax would be $35,671 – about 18% of their adjusted gross income. This is a hypothetical example used for illustrative purposes only. It assumes no tax credits apply.

2022 Federal Income Tax Brackets

Your federal income tax bracket is determined by two factors: your total income and your tax-filing classification. For the 2022 tax year, there are seven tax brackets for ordinary income – ranging from 10% to 37% – and four classifications: single, married filing jointly, married filing separately, and head of household.3

1. Investopedia.com, 2021
2. IRS.gov, 2022
3. IRS.gov, 2022

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2022 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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