Helpful Retirement Strategies for Women

Helpful Retirement Strategies for Women

Preparing for retirement can look a little different for women than it does for men. Although stereotypes are changing, women are still more likely to serve as caretakers than men are, meaning they accumulate less income and benefits due to their time absent from the workforce. Research shows that 39% of women took a significant amount of time off work to care for loved ones – compared to 24% of men.1 Women who are working also tend to put less money aside for retirement, saving just 7% of their paychecks on average, while men save closer to 10%.2

These numbers may seem overwhelming, but you don’t have to be a statistic. With a little foresight, you can start taking steps now, which may help you in the long run. Here are three steps to consider that may put you ahead of the curve.

1. Talk about money. Nowadays, discussing money is less taboo than it’s been in the past, and it’s crucial to taking control of your financial future. If you’re single, consider writing down your retirement goals and keep them readily accessible. If you have a partner, make sure you are both on the same page regarding your retirement goals.3,4 The more comfortably you can talk about your future, the more confident you may be to make important decisions when they come up.

2. Be proactive about your retirement. Do you have clear, defined goals for what you want your retirement to look like? And do you know where your retirement accounts stand today? Being proactive with your retirement accounts allows you to create a goal-oriented roadmap. It may also help you adapt when necessary and continue your journey regardless of things like relationship status or market fluctuations.2

3. Make room for your future in your budget. Adjust your budget to allow for retirement savings, just as you would for a new home or your dream vacation. Like any of your other financial goals, you may find it beneficial to review your retirement goals on a regular basis to make sure you’re on track.3

Retirement may look a little different for women, but with the right strategies – and support – you’ll be able to live the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.

1. Pew Research, 2019
2. Money Talks News, 2019
3. Forbes, 2019
4. MarketWatch, 2019

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG, LLC, is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright 2021 FMG Suite.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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The Call for a Minimum Global Corporate Tax

The Call for a Minimum Global Corporate Tax

In a speech to the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has called for a minimum corporate income tax that would be shared by countries all over the world.1

The decrease of corporate tax rates around the world has led to what Yellen has described as a “30-year race to the bottom,” which has led to tax systems that have difficulty raising sufficient revenue. While low corporate tax rates might seem good for businesses, the other side of the coin is that countries with insufficient revenue are unable to make investments in important public needs. Some of those needs also serve the corporations, such as highways, rail, and ports needed to transport goods, to name but one example.1

Yellen says she intends to work with the White House and a group of 20 nations to set a minimum that helps the advanced economies meet their various needs.1

While the idea of a global minimum might cause alarm for some, it’s a complicated issue, with a variety of potential pros and cons to consider. You might have questions or concerns, especially if you are a business owner. I’d be happy to discuss that with you and help you understand this issue as it unfolds.

1. APNews.com, April 5, 2020

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite, LLC, is not affiliated with the named representative, broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.</>

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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IRA and HSA deadline postponed by the IRS

IRA and HSA deadline postponed by the IRS

Previously, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced that the federal income tax filing due date for individuals for the 2020 tax year had been automatically extended from April 15, 2021, to May 17, 2021.1

More time for all
However, the IRS has also settled on May 17, 2021 as the deadline for contributions to individual retirement arrangements (IRAs and Roth IRAs), health savings accounts (HSAs), and Coverdell education savings accounts (Coverdell ESAs)2

No additional tax until May 17, 2021
This also automatically postpones to May 17, 2021, the deadline for reporting and payment of the 10% additional tax on amounts includible in gross income from 2020, distributions from IRAs, or workplace-based retirement plans.3

What about estimated tax payments?
Keep in mind that this does not alter the April 15, 2021, deadline for estimated tax payments; these payments are still due on April 15. Taxes must be paid as taxpayers earn or receive income during the year, either through withholding or estimated tax payments.4

1. IRS.gov, March 17, 2021
2. IRS.gov, March 29, 2021
3. IRS.gov, March 29, 2021
4. IRS.gov, March 29, 2021

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite, LLC, is not affiliated with the named representative, broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.

Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.

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Paying for the Infrastructure Bill

Paying for the Infrastructure Bill

President Joe Biden introduced the much-anticipated American Jobs Plan, which outlines an approach to spend roughly $2.2 trillion on the nation’s infrastructure and other projects.

As part of the legislative process, the Biden administration also laid out a proposal for paying for the domestic investment. The plan includes raising the corporate tax rate to 28% from 21%, cracking down on companies that use overseas operations to manage profits, and eliminating tax breaks for some industries.1

Right now, the proposal does not include any new taxes on individuals. It’s only targeting corporations expecting that the 8-year plan would pay for itself in 15 years.2

But some believe that in the coming weeks, the Biden administration intends to put forward additional tax initiatives that target high-earning Americans.

One proposal that may get introduced would raise taxes on families who earn more than $400,000 a year. There also has been discussion about a higher capital gains tax rate for individuals earning at least $1 million a year and adjustments to the estate tax exemption.3

At this point, it’s uncertain what—if any—tax changes for individuals will be taken up by Congress. The initiatives that will take priority may become more clear in the weeks ahead.

Challenge yourself to be patient during this period of debate over tax proposals. If they introduce changes, a sound analysis should drive portfolio decisions, not knee-jerk reactions to current events. Remember, this letter is for informational purposes only. It is not a replacement for real-life advice, so make sure to consult your tax, legal, and accounting professionals before modifying your tax strategy.

If you are concerned about one or more of these proposals, please give us a call. We’d welcome the chance to hear your perspective, and hopefully, we can provide some guidance.

1. CNBC.com, March 31, 2021
2. USAToday.com, March 31, 2021
3. Bloomberg.com, March 14, 2021
The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite, LLC, is not affiliated with the named representative, broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.

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Dr. Jason Van Duyn
586-731-6020
AQuest Wealth Strategies
President

Dr. Jason Van Duyn CFP®, ChFC, CLU, MBA is a Registered Representative with and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor. Member FINRA & SIPC. The LPL Financial registered representative associated with this site may only discuss and/or transact securities business with residents of the following states: IN, IL, TX, MI, NC, AZ, VA, FL, OH and CO.